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My quick take on the first night of the virtual Democratic National Convention

Max Stearns


In 1996, Jim and Sarah Brady appeared at the Democratic National Convention. Jim Brady, Ronald Reagan's Assistant and later his Press Secretary, had been a shooting victim in the same event that nearly took the life of President Reagan. Reasonable gun regulation had become the major concern for the Bradys, encouraging their appearance at the other side's later convention to make their case.


Last night was different. And it was profound. The argument was not that there is a singular issue concerning which the Democrats have landed in a better place. The repeated messages--from children, mothers, fathers, Republicans, Democrats of all stripes, and of the full range of ideologies, was plain and simple. This election is about decency and humanity, traits that Joe Biden exemplifies and has modeled throughout his career. It is also about the soul of a nation whose citizens risk dying unnecessarily and which itself risks suffering the same tragic fate as past failed democracies. This is existential.


I recently came to the sad realization that it is unwise to continue trying to argue with so-called never Trumpers who somehow manage, never, to join forces with those who might actually ensure never (again) Trump. It was wonderful to see some thoughtful reflective Republicans who genuinely get it. It would have been more so if none of it was the product of avoidable deaths of family members. Trumpers and Trump apologists will find things to hate about last night, to pick apart, even to ridicule. And with them, I will no longer waste energy arguing. My hope is that that there are others that this is somehow reaching. Our nation depends on it.


I welcome your comments.

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